The Weed Blog

Today
It sounds like an interesting challenge. Staging an authentic-looking zombie apocalypse while -- at the same time -- not scratching up any of Grizzly Creek Lodge's nice new furniture.But that's exactly what Jon Cooke has spent the past five-and-a-half weeks doing. Taking Knott's Berry Farm's recently refurbished Camp Snoopy and -- using the 45 minutes between when this Buena Park theme park closes for the day and when Halloween Haunt officially opens for the night -- then transforming this family-friendly area into a six-acre wide kill zone.More...
Sat, Nov 01, 2014
Source: Huffington Post
The best thing about Tim Cook's coming out was what it was not. It did not come as the result of some sex scandal perhaps involving an employee. It was not an embarrassing disclosure after being caught in some public restroom or a park. It was not a grudging coming out after years of very public denials and the usual "my personal life is private" protestations. It did not even come with any grand pretensions to being a catalyst for changing hearts and minds in an acrimonious debate about same-sex marriage or discrimination laws. He was not getting some kind of tech equivalent of a Golden Globe lifetime award and feeling expansive.One cannot even really say Tim Cook "came out" for it implies he was in a closet all this time. But actually most people thought he was already out. But now that he has officially confirmed it, the reaction has been fairly ho-hum. There will be no grand boycott of Apple launched by conservatives. Republican senator Ted Cruz told CNBC "Those are his personal choices. I'll tell you. I love my iPhone. Listen Tim Cook makes personal choices and that's his life."More...
Sat, Nov 01, 2014
Source: Huffington Post
PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) -- Two Hawaii residents have been arrested for trespassing to see lava, police said Friday amid growing interest from people eager to witness the slow-moving flow.Hawaii County police said officers saw a man and a woman on county property Thursday taking photos within 5 feet of the lava in the small town of Pahoa.More...
Sat, Nov 01, 2014
Source: Huffington Post
WASHINGTON -- With the United States accelerating its withdrawal from Afghanistan after helping to establish a new unity government there, a congressionally created watchdog warned this week that despite the signs of progress, Afghanistan is more unstable than ever: Insurgent attacks are on the rise, funded by an under-investigated and thriving opium-based economy, and the competence of the Afghan security forces is in doubt.The latest report from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), released on Thursday, illustrates the precarious situation remaining in Afghanistan. As the U.S. looks to wrap up its longest-running military engagement, the report warns that America cannot stop paying attention to Kabul just yet.More...
Sat, Nov 01, 2014
Source: Huffington Post
Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) said in an op-ed on Friday that marijuana legalization is "sound policy," and he urged Oregonians to follow in Colorado's footsteps and vote yes on recreational marijuana in next week's election."Colorado is approaching the first anniversary of legally regulated recreational marijuana for adults," Polis wrote in the Bend Bulletin. "The implementation of our new laws has gone smoothly overall, providing an excellent example for other states to follow. Our success has made it clear that when marijuana is regulated like alcohol, it can decrease crime, help fund schools and drug education programs, and keep money out of the hands of criminals and cartels."More...
Sat, Nov 01, 2014
Source: Huffington Post
Earlier
By Dr. Richard Bayer, Co-Chief Petitioner of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act OMMP Stays the Same. Measure 91 doesn’t impact the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. Measure 91 explicitly states that the rights of OMMP cardholders won’t be impacted. Research. This law allows state money to be used for research on the benefits and appropriate uses [...]
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: The Weed Blog
It's a fact: if you live in New York City and your skin is anything but white, it's a high likelihood that you'll eventually get hassled by the NYPD using the "stop and frisk" policy to try and...
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Toke of the Town
As the television camera lights shine on Pat McLellan's face, he holds up a set of four sheets of paper, each a signed pledge from a gubernatorial candidate saying that they support expanding Mi...
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Toke of the Town
Weedmaps.com has long been a pioneer in the online cannabis market. Since 2008, their interactive marijuana dispensary map has led untold thousands of cannabis enthusiasts to their local pot shop...
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Toke of the Town
Raskal OG CannabisStrain Review And Pics The Raskal OG marijuana strain is one of my favorites to smoke because while it’s dense, it burns thoroughly. I take a lot of waterfall hits, and having a consistency like that is important so that the nugs don’t burn too fast or slow. The Raskal OG marijuana strain [...]
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: The Weed Blog
Residents of Washington, D.C. began early voting on October 25. One of the choices on their ballots is whether to approve Initiative 71. The ballot initiative would legalize marijuana for recreational use. With less than a week left to vote, however, the city isn’t waiting for the results to begin planning the next step. The D.C. City Council held a hearing Thursday on the taxation and regulation of marijuana in the District. Unlike Colorado and Washington — states that legalized recreational marijuana sales in 2012 — District voters cannot use a ballot initiative to regulate and tax marijuana. Initiative 71 would decriminalize the possession of up to two ounces of marijuana and allow for cultivation of up to six plants, but sale would still be illegal. Regulation and taxation of the industry, valued by District financial officials at $130 million a year, is up to the Council. “If the referendum passes on Tuesday, which I hope it does, the council will be in the position of having to set up a regulatory framework and taxing it will be part of that framework,” said D.C. Council member Jack Evans, a Democrat, who also oversaw Thursday’s hearing on the bill. [The Washington Times] “When I introduced the Marijuana Legalization and Regulation Act in September of 2013, none of my colleagues were willing to be co-introducers [sic] or co-sponsors,” Council member David Grasso said at the hearing. Times have changed with council members now supporting marijuana legalization. The 2014 Legalization and Regulation Act proposes a 6 percent sales tax on medical marijuana and a 15 percent sales tax on marijuana “for all other purposes.” That 15 percent would bring in $19.5 million a year. The $130-million valuation came from the District’s Director of Financial and Legislative Analysis, Yesim Sayin Taylor. He based it on an assumed 122,000 marijuana users buying three ounces of marijuana per year at $350 per ounce. It’s easy to see that possibility with D.C. being the only legal recreational marijuana market East of Colorado. With low application fees of $350 each for producer and retailer licenses, the market would be very open. The Council has good reason to prepare themselves for Initiative 71’s passage. Public Policy Polling conducted a survey of D.C. voters between October 20 and 22. A majority of 52 percent said that if the election were help today, they would vote yes. Even if the 13 percent still undecided join the 35 percent against, it would still lead to a 52 percent to 48 percent victory for recreational marijuana. A separate question asked whether selling less than an ounce of marijuana should be permitted and taxed. With 43 percent in favor and only 12 percent against selling marijuana in any amount, it looks like the marijuana industry is coming to D.C. in a big way.
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Marijuana News
By Phillip Smith Election Day is less than a week away, and it’s not just statewide marijuana, medical marijuana, sentencing reform, and drug testing initiatives that we’re watching. In five states, voters in some cities or counties will have opportunities to cast ballots for local marijuana reform measures. In four out of the five states—California [...]
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: The Weed Blog
Our sister paper, The Denver Westword, had a post earlier this week about a Denver Police Department campaign focusing on trick-or-treaters and the possibility they might be given pot edibles for...
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Toke of the Town
If you missed it, take a look now. This is like a real trip with Rick Steves, including his recent voyage, ideas for your own travels and, of course, a bit more info about why he is with us on Measure 91. Learn more at http://voteyeson91.com. If you have already voted, thank you for participating [...]
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: The Weed Blog
St. Louis County prosecuting attorney Bob McCulloch dismissed five pending felony court cases Wednesday because they depend on testimony from Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.Wilson is a key...
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Toke of the Town
Reading, MA – Bay State Repeal, a ballot-initiative committee dedicated to passing the least restrictive law possible to replace marijuana prohibition in Massachusetts in 2016, notes the Elections Division of the Office of the Secretary of State recently announced the question numbers of this year’s public policy questions as they will appear on district ballots. [...]
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: The Weed Blog
In Hebrew, Tikkun Olam means “repairing the world.” The philosophy behind the phrase is idealistic, but the leading Israeli medical marijuana company appears to be trying its best to deliver on that goal. Tikun Olam was founded in 2006 with the goal of getting medical marijuana to those that needed it (sick people), at no cost. The company is licensed by the Israeli government (which has made medical marijuana federally legal, with tight restrictions) to grow marijuana and distribute it to the nation’s hospitals, clinical research teams, and, of course, to the country’s registered patients. The company projects an image of scientific research and public service, and has the history to back it up. Tikun Olam has initiated programs encompassing individuals from pediatric late-stage cancer patients to the elderly, and addresses a multitude of physical and psychological ailments that, they believe, can be helped with the educated use of medical marijuana. Model citizen There are plenty of companies out there, in the U.S. and abroad, that are taking a more professional approach to the industry; but few have led by example. Tikun Olam breaks from the pack with services such as giving its patients detailed guidelines and recommendations on how to ingest the medicine via literature and a brick-and-mortar “instruction center” in Tel Aviv. The company works very closely with regulators, supplying and supporting the largest government-run hospital (Sheba Medical Center), and executing PR campaigns reminding the world that Israel is a global leader in science, medicine, and technology — not simply a war-torn nation. On the latter note, the company works towards its eponymous philosophy, too. Tikun Olam has attempted to partner with humanitarian organizations to get its products into the hands of Palestine’s ill. The success of this appears uncertain, though, due to cultural attitudes towards marijuana in the region. How it works For Tikun Olam’s 4,000+ patients, the company runs its business according to the government’s efficient, logical system. Patients pay a $100 monthly membership fee that is not tied to any specific quantity of marijuana. For first-timers, there is a mandatory $40 fee for a tutorial on how to properly consume marijuana. Sick children receive their medication for free. The company, led by white coat-wearing scientists and agronomists in addition to caregiving nurses and doctors, cultivates a wide variety of strains and manufactures various forms of consumable cannabis. There are high-THC content strains for severe pain relief, and anti-inflammatory CBD strains with no psychoactive effect. Patients can obtain flower, edible and even pill forms of the meds. A solid start Tikum Olam’s leadership in Israel’s medical marijuana experiment is admirable. While the industry is in its infancy, compared to a slightly further along one in the United States, medical professionals and politicians seem optimistic for the future. Back home, cannabis advocates and business owners are wise to take note: this industry will emerge faster and better by serving a greater good through conscious, sophisticated practices.
Fri, Oct 31, 2014
Source: Marijuana News
Whether you’re carrying anything illegal or not, flashing police lights in your rear-view sets the heart racing and adrenaline pumping for even the most unflappable among us. How the next few minutes unfold will be determined by a host of factors, many within your control. A big part of not getting arrested comes down to little more than common sense; If you’re swerving all over the road smoking a blunt with four friends in the car at midnight, you might as well paint “arrest me, please” on your rear windshield. The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution guarantees citizens protection against unreasonable searches and seizures of their person and effects without probable cause. This is the legal standard officers must meet in order for the state to get a conviction. But asserting these rights during the actual encounter won’t necessarily protect you in the moment. “There’s the legal rules and then there’s the reality of the way police act,” Denver criminal attorney Sean McAllister said in an interview. “The bottom line is police pretty much do what they want.” If an officer lights you up, put on your turn signal, turn off the radio and promptly but safely pull the car over to the right as far over as you can. Turn off the engine, roll down your window and place your hands at 10 and 2 on the steering wheel. Do not make sudden movements or reach for your identification until asked. These steps are intended to put the officer at ease as he or she approaches your vehicle. There are dangerous people out there, so subtle indications like these decrease the odds of the encounter escalating. “If the officer says ‘get out of the car, I’m searching your car I have probable cause,’ whether they do or not is something the courts will determine later, but you certainly don’t want to interfere with them in any way at that point,” McAllister says. You’re looking for a brief, frictionless transaction with the officer. Be sure your license and registration and insurance are current as required by law and be able to prove it. Lacking these documents will only prolong the encounter and give you a chance to say or do something incriminating. Be polite — “yes, officer”, “no, officer.” Keep your answers as brief as possible. Remember, arrested or not, you have the right to remain silent. Besides giving them identification and your vehicle registration, you’re not obligated to answer questions about where you’re going, where you’ve been, what your favorite color is or anything else they might ask. “You have to give the officer your ID and proof of registration if requested,” McAllister said. “Beyond that you don’t have an obligation to do anything.” McAllister even advises against taking roadside sobriety tests, and says despite what an officer might say there is no legal consequence for refusal. He noted that 30 percent of people who fail a roadside exam were actually sober. Taking the test can only harm you in court, giving the district attorney a much stronger case with which to convict you. “Police will tell you if you don’t agree to one I’ll arrest you for DUI and kind of try to threaten you into taking the test, but your consent really needs to be voluntary;” McAllister said. “Admitting to marijuana use in the recent past would also not be very smart. I don’t tell people to lie, but you don’t have to say anything if the cop asks the last time you smoked marijuana.” Some officers might try to buddy up to you, to convince you they’re on your side or promise they’ll put in a good word for you with the judge or prosecutor. Don’t take the bait. In a roadside pullover situation, the cops are not your advocates. Their job is to gather information that can be used to arrest and convict you, and some will use manipulative tactics to do it. If they haven’t searched your car yet on their own volition, they might be waiting for you to unwittingly admit to something that gives them legal permission to search. “My personal opinion is, when you get to the point of ‘when’s the last time you smoked marijuana?’, ‘How often do you use marijuana?’ I would not answer any of those questions,” McAllister said. “You should never give them any incriminating evidence. Anything you do or say could be incriminating.” If you are carrying contraband on the road, the more distance put between you and it the better. Do not put it in the glove compartment, as you’ll probably need to open it to retrieve identification documents. And don’t keep it in your pocket, as finding it during a “weapons pat-down” would certainly give the officer iron clad probable cause to search the rest of your vehicle and arrest you. But be warned: keeping your stash in the trunk won’t necessarily protect you from the powerful nose of a drug-sniffing dog. In the 2005 U.S. Supreme Court case Illinois v. Caballes, the high court ruled 6-2 that dogs could be used at the scene of a roadside pullover without probable cause on the grounds the dogs were being used to find something illegal. The ruling, however, does not give an officer the right to indefinitely detain you while a dog can be retrieved, according to FlexYourRights, a nonprofit civil liberties advocate group. If you feel an officer might be detaining you without cause, just ask, McAllister says. “Ask ‘Am I being detained? Am I under arrest? Am I free to go?’ “, He said. “If they say you’re free to go then you leave, but if not, it means you’re being detained. That’s when you might want to assert your right not to say anything else.” The vast majority of roadside pullovers end without incident, and the vast majority of police officers are hard working men and women trying to do right by their community. But it’s the outlying scenarios that require the most preparation, especially when your freedom is on the line. RELATED: Driving While High: What Does ‘Impairment’ Really Mean? Let’s Face It, High Driving Is Just as Dumb as Drunk Driving
Thu, Oct 30, 2014
Source: Marijuana News
Traditionally, candidates for elected office have shied away from discussing marijuana, seeing it as a marginalized, third-rail issue that’s dangerous to touch. This year, however, more politicians have noticed that a growing number of voters actually support marijuana reform. A record number of candidates have decided that taking positive positions can help, and won’t hurt, at the ballot box. Here’s a rundown of U.S. Senate races where marijuana is playing a role: In Colorado, Sen. Mark Udall has told the feds to “butt out” of Colorado’s marijuana law, pushing for legal access to banking services for marijuana businesses. His opponent, Cory Gardner, has repeatedly voted against House amendments that would de-fund DEA raids on state-legal medical marijuana businesses. In Kansas, Sen. Pat Roberts says legalizing marijuana is a state decision, while his opponent, independent Greg Orman, has called the overall drug war a failure. In New Jersey, Sen. Cory Booker has led bipartisan efforts to scale back the federal war on drugs and let states set their own marijuana laws without interference. His opponent, Jeff Bell, on the other hand, ridiculed Booker during a recent debate for being endorsed by NORML. In Kentucky, Sen. Mitch McConnell opposes legalization but, in partnership with Sen. Rand Paul, has led efforts to let the state’s farmers grow hemp without federal interference. His opponent, Alison Lundergan Grimes, says she thinks it’s time to at least discuss legalizing medical marijuana. In Oregon, Sen. Jeff Merkley says he’s leaning toward supporting the legalization initiative that’s on his state’s ballot. His opponent, Monica Wehby, says, “We should wait and see what happens in Colorado and Washington.” On the House side of the U.S. Capitol, where every member is up for reelection every two years, there has been a flurry of marijuana legislation being voted on during the past session of Congress. Drug Policy Action (DPA) has a helpful voter guide that tracks and grades every member of the U.S. House for their votes on marijuana issues. Here are some members of Congress that have gone above and beyond in pushing for marijuana reform, earning the title of “Champions of Reform” from DPA: Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-3rd/OR) Rep. Blumenauer introduced several important drug policy reform bills in the 113th Congress, including the States’ Medical Marijuana Property Rights Protection Act (H.R. 689) and the Small Business Tax Equity Act (H.R. 2240). He has also spoken often on the House floor during key debates about the issue. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-48th/CA) Rep. Rohrabacher has worked over the last several years to champion legislative efforts to protect individuals acting in compliance with state medical marijuana laws from federal arrest and prosecution, finally leading the way to a bipartisan victory on the House floor this year. He also introduced the Respect State Marijuana Laws Act (H.R. 1523) and has co-sponsored several other pro-reform bills. Rep. Steve Cohen (D-9th/TN) Rep. Cohen has frequently questioned marijuana prohibition policies in congressional hearings, co-sponsored important drug policy reform legislation and spoken in favor of drug policy reform on the House floor. He also introduced two important drug policy reform bills in the 113th Congress. The Unmuzzle the Drug Czar Act (H.R. 4046) would repeal a provision of federal law that requires the U.S. Drug Czar, to “take such actions as necessary to oppose any attempt to legalize the use” of marijuana or any Schedule I drug for medical or non-medical use. The provision prohibits the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy from honestly studying legalization or speaking freely and truthfully about marijuana policy. He also introduced the National Commission on Federal Marijuana Policy Act (H.R. 1635). Rep. Jared Polis (D-2nd/CO) Rep. Polis led efforts to roll back federal marijuana prohibition on several fronts and continued to build on a track record of effective leadership in Congress that began when he first took office in 2009. In the 113th Congress he introduced the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act (H.R. 499) and co-sponsored several other reform bills. He also sponsored a floor amendment, House Vote 250, which would have prevented the DEA from getting increased funding. In addition, Rep. Polis has championed efforts to reform federal laws restricting industrial hemp cultivation within the United States. Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-16th/TX) Rep. O’Rourke co-sponsored several drug policy reform bills and was a critic of the war on drugs before running for Congress, even writing a book dedicated to the subject. Rep. Barbara Lee (D-13th/CA) Rep. Lee supported drug policy reform in a number of important ways during the 113th Congress. In addition to co-sponsoring several positive bills, she introduced the States’ Medical Marijuana Property Rights Protection Act (H.R. 784). Rep. Thomas Massie (R-4th/KY) Rep. Massie championed efforts to reform federal laws restricting industrial hemp cultivation. He co-sponsored a floor amendment, House Vote 269, to allow colleges and universities to cultivate legal industrial hemp for research purposes and sponsored another floor amendment, House Vote 257, barring the DEA from spending funds to undermine state hemp cultivation laws. Rep. Sam Farr (D-20th/CA) Rep. Farr played a leading role in building support for the medical marijuana floor amendment (House Vote 258) offered by Rep. Rohrabacher. He also sponsored the Truth in Trials Act (H.R. 710). Rep. Bobby Scott (D-3rd/VA) Rep. Scott introduced several pieces of criminal justice reform legislation: Youth PROMISE Act (H.R. 1318); The Justice Safety Valve Act (H.R. 1695); Fair Sentencing Clarification Act (H.R. 2369); and Fairness in Cocaine Sentencing Act (H.R. 2372). Rep. Scott served as an important advocate for drug policy reform, and particularly in support of repealing mandatory minimum sentencing laws, as a member of the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary. Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-AL/DC) Because she represents the District of Columbia, Rep. Norton is not permitted by congressional leadership to vote on amendments or other legislation that reach the floor of the House. But she doesn’t let that stop her from championing the cause of drug policy reform in other ways. When Rep. Andy Harris (R-1st/MD) spearheaded an effort to undermine the implementation of a local marijuana reform law in Washington, D.C., Rep. Norton took to the floor of the House to persuasively and effectively request that her congressional colleagues not interfere in local efforts to reduce racial disparities in its criminal justice system. Even though more and more elected officials seem to realize that voters want marijuana reform, there are a handful who still just don’t get it and are trying to impede progress however possible. These legislators have been tagged “Drug War Extremists” by DPA: Rep. Andy Harris (R-1st/MD) Although Rep. Andy Harris has only completed one term in office, he has quickly cemented his reputation as being the lawmaker who has made it his mission to try and block a popular law in the District of Columbia that eliminated criminal penalties for the possession of small amounts of marijuana. In June 2014, Rep. Harris offered an amendment during a congressional committee markup of a federal spending bill to block District of Columbia lawmakers from implementing its marijuana decriminalization law and also would have blocked D.C. from legalizing marijuana in the future. The amendment was accepted by Republicans on the committee. Fortunately, Rep. Harris has been unsuccessful in pushing that amendment through the entire process of being enacted into law, meaning that D.C.’s local reforms are safe for now. Rep. John Fleming (R-4th/LA) Over the past two years, Rep. John Fleming could be counted on to defend drug war extremism and status quo marijuana policies. Whether taking to the floor to speak against floor amendments that would support states’ rights to reform their marijuana laws, improve access to medical marijuana and improve the ability of states to regulate marijuana businesses, to distorting and misrepresenting the facts about marijuana use in hearings, floor speeches and briefings, Rep. Fleming has been a committed foe of marijuana reform efforts in Congress. Rep. Fleming introduced an amendment on the House floor to block efforts by the Obama administration to allow marijuana businesses to access banking services, but it failed on a 186-236 vote. If you don’t know who your representative in Congress is, you can find out here. And don’t forget to vote on November 4! You can find your polling place here.
Thu, Oct 30, 2014
Source: Marijuana News
Far too often, members of America’s expanding Cannabis Nation think they are better automobile drivers when they are stoned. That is an outdated notion that needs to end.  Drugged driving, as it’s officially titled, is a legitimate threat to personal and public safety, even if it’s not as pervasive as drinking-related traffic incidents. Don’t believe it? Look at the stats. Colorado’s Department of Transportation has the figures, and they aren’t pretty. In 2006, there were 721 drivers involved in fatal incidents. 27 drivers tested positive for cannabis only — around 3.74 percent. In 2012, there were fewer total fatalities — 630, but 35 drivers tested positive for cannabis only. That’s 5.56 percent. Columbia University delivered a study to the American Journal of Epidemiology finding that, in 20 states that had legalized marijuana in some form or another, fatal accidents involving drivers with cannabis in their systems increased three-fold from 1999 to 2010. People can debate the impact of drugged driving versus drunk driving, and discuss how, when they drive stoned, many claim to drive under the speed limit and check eight times before changing lanes. The more effective exercise is to just not do it. Instead, those under the influence of cannabis can lead by example and give the nation one more reason to support legal marijuana policy. In our technology-driven world, it’s incredibly easy to stay away from the driver’s seat while impaired. Everyone is familiar with on-demand car services Uber and Lyft. The two industry leaders provide private transportation in minutes at prices below traditional taxis and hired drivers. The drivers range from licensed limo operators to average Joe’s looking for some extra cash. There are other services available, too. Curb is one of them, and it’s different than its competitors because it provides on-demand access to professional car services and traditional taxis (i.e., no amateur drivers). The company was operating as taxi-hailing service Taxi Magic before it rebranded and widened its appeal. Today, users can reach Curb in 60 cities and can hail cabs from 90 companies, in addition to fully licensed and insured car services. In Colorado, the company works with industry giant Yellow Cab. Conveniently, riders can pay with cash, too. Today, Curb and Weedmaps launched a joint promotional campaign to encourage safe driving. Through the campaign, first-time Curb users can use the promo code “WEEDMAPS” to receive $15 off their first ride. “Our partnership with Weedmaps supports Curb’s core mission of providing safe, reliable ground travel to riders around the country,” said Matt Carrington, Curb’s vice president of marketing. “Together we can spread the word about responsible consumption and provide individuals with a viable, immediate alternative to driving impaired.” If one is light on cash after a night (or day) of fun, fall back on the old reliable designated driver system. It’s free, and it keeps everyone safe. For those at a friend’s party — it’s best to stay there. Even with a pooch at home waiting, an overnight absence is preferable to a permanent one. Along with any other intoxicant, cannabis-users have no reason to get behind the wheel after a night up in smoke. While a chauffeured ride home may cost a couple bucks, it’s far less than the some of the alternatives. RELATED: Driving While High: What Does ‘Impairment’ Really Mean? The Silent Treatment: On (Not) Talking To Police
Thu, Oct 30, 2014
Source: Marijuana News